Pages: [1] 2   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Bryophytes  (Read 36254 times)
terrestrial_man
New member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 18


WWW
« on: January 05, 2008, 02:02:37 PM »

I am wondering if there is anyone studying the mosses of Georgia and/or if there is any generalized (or otherwise) reference material on the mosses of Georgia?
Logged
Rich
Distinguished Botanist
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 177



« Reply #1 on: January 05, 2008, 07:17:40 PM »

A very good question.  We will have to move this one up the chain and see what the status is.
Logged

Rich Reaves
Austrinum
New member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 19


« Reply #2 on: January 05, 2008, 09:28:11 PM »

I don't think anyone is working on the moss flora of Georgia.  Such things are just not done in academia much anymore, especially on bryophytes.  A field study of the mosses of Georgia is long overdue. 

A professor at West Georgia College compiled a list of the mosses of Georgia way back in the 70's, but it did not involve any field work, just lists of mosses in herbaria and in the literature.  The list is now terribly obsolete.

The only person I know who is actively collecting in the area is a professor at the University of North Alabama, Dr. Paul Davison.

I'm afraid there is no reference on mosses that is specific to Georgia.  The best technical reference that covers our area is Mosses of Eastern North America by Howard Crum and Lewis Anderson.  It is now 25 years old and may be hard to find.  The first bryophyte volume of The Flora of North America (Vol. 27 Bryophytes, mosses Part I) came out recently, but I haven't had time yet to look at the keys.  It would certainly have the most up to date nomenclature.
I have some other references that might be useful, mostly from Florida and the Gulf Coast, if you are interested.
Logged
Rich
Distinguished Botanist
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 177



« Reply #3 on: January 06, 2008, 02:34:34 PM »

Bobby Hattaway offers this regarding the current status of Bryophyte work in GA:

Bruce Allen, a bryologist at the Missouri Bot Gardens and a former office mate, states that there is no he knows of working on the mosses of Georgia.  Robert Wyatt seems have returned to the University of Georgia after a time as Director of the Highlands Biological Station, but he doesn’t work on floristics.

Logged

Rich Reaves
Scott
New member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 15


« Reply #4 on: January 07, 2008, 06:55:46 PM »

As those above have indicated, bryophytes seem to be somewhat "left behind" here in Georgia.

While that may be the case here, the most recent addition to the Flora of North America (August 2007) is Volume 27, Bryophyta, part 1. A number of years ago the moss folks began a project to create a "bryophyte flora of NA" and about five years ago it was incorporated into FNA project. Now the first volume has been published, and is a masterful tome as the first of three volumes on the mosses of North America.

BE FOREWARNED! This reference is not for the faint of heart. It is a very detailed work and the keys REQUIRE the use of a compound microscope and some chemistry. It does include some very useful--if technical--information on the morphology of mosses.

Since this is such a technical book, I doubt many will buy it. I have a standing subscription with Oxford University Press for the entire series (and get a good discount). You can read the whole thing online at

http://www.efloras.org/volume_page.aspx?volume_id=1027&flora_id=1

Scott Ranger
Logged
sanguinaria
New member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 15



« Reply #5 on: January 07, 2008, 07:32:57 PM »

Paul Davison, who teaches bryology at Univ of North Alabama and at Highlands Biological Station, is very knowledgeable about mosses of the SE.  Here is a link to his web site:
http://www2.una.edu/pdavis/bryophytes.htm
Logged
Austrinum
New member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 19


« Reply #6 on: January 08, 2008, 11:39:13 AM »

BE FOREWARNED! This reference is not for the faint of heart. It is a very detailed work and the keys REQUIRE the use of a compound microscope and some chemistry. It does include some very useful--if technical--information on the morphology of mosses.

Scott Ranger

If you are going to study bryophytes you need access to a compound microscope, a dissecting scope, dyes, and equipment to do cross sections of leaves.  Some mosses, such as the sphagnums, can only be separated to species by looking at characteristics of the individual cells.  In the case of sphagnum, you need a dye to see the banding patterns on the cell walls. 

Dr. Davison at UNA teaches a bryophyte ID course at the Highland Botanical Station.  It is open
to the public and would be very worthwhile to anyone interested in byrophyte taxonomy. 

While Dr. Robert Wyatt is primarily a Plant Population Ecologist, he is also one of the best bryologists
I've ever come across and has written a number of papers on bryophyte floristics.  I did a study of the
mosses of Pine Mountain under him many years ago and he was extremely supportive.  His wife, Anne Stoneburner is also a fine bryologist.  If I remember correctly, she did her PhD dissertation on Weissia controversa.

Hal
Logged
terrestrial_man
New member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 18


WWW
« Reply #7 on: January 08, 2008, 05:15:29 PM »

Thanks for the information and links.
It would seem that what info is out there is generally not readily accessible to the public, apart from
Paul Davison's site which has images of some of the mosses in the general region. 
I am aware of the work at MOBOT on a flora of the bryophytes of North America http://www.mobot.org/plantscience/bfna/bfnamenu.htm

My own interests are in ecology and horticulture with taxonomy being a tool of identification rather than as a focus of interest.  Had only a semester of bryology under Dr. Norris at Humboldt State in Arcata, CA.

Apparently Duke University has a large database on the bryophytes of the SE USA which can provide localized information on the distribution of the species which I think is the real starting point on trying to develop some kind of overview of the native mosses. My own reason for the inquiry is that I shall be preparing a webjournal of some of the terrestrial species that occur on the Piedmont and want to include id to genus.  I shall hoof it for the time being!

Logged
Scott
New member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 15


« Reply #8 on: January 08, 2008, 10:18:51 PM »

Two more people outstanding in bryophytes are D.K. Smith and Ken McFarland at UT Knoxville. They were both students and teachers under Jack Sharp who spent his life studying bryophytes. Ken works with the gardens and the herbarium at UT and they have an extensive collection. If you need contact info, I can provide it privately.

BTW, D.K. and I are both Humboldt grads and actually shared one semester at the school at the same time. I didn't meet until two decades later in the Smokies. So it's great to see another Humboldt person!

Scott Ranger
Logged
terrestrial_man
New member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 18


WWW
« Reply #9 on: January 12, 2008, 07:15:25 PM »

Here are the two pages of the general webjournal on the Georgia mosses. I will be loading these onto my website and will include
the references I used to develop the body of the text. All images are my own.
please keep in mind the object of my journal is to provide as much information at a generalized level that will give a rough idea
as to possible cultural conditions necessary (perhaps) for a successful cultivation of these plants.

 




« Last Edit: March 07, 2008, 01:29:50 PM by terrestrial_man » Logged
terrestrial_man
New member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 18


WWW
« Reply #10 on: January 15, 2008, 06:08:37 PM »

Correction to the journal above:
Source is from Clayton County.
Just heard from collector in GA and am correcting journal to new county location.
Logged
Austrinum
New member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 19


« Reply #11 on: January 18, 2008, 11:23:56 PM »

That is an odd list of bryophytes for the Georgia piedmont.  Some of them are unusual
in the piedmont, or may not occur there at all, while some of the
most common genera (especially if you are interested in horticultural uses) are not
included - Leucobryum, Atrichum, and Polytrichum. 

What are you using as a reference?  A couple of the genera appear
to have outdated names.

Hal
Logged
terrestrial_man
New member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 18


WWW
« Reply #12 on: January 19, 2008, 02:08:49 PM »

I can believe it.  I used The Mosses and Liverworts"  by H. S. Conard, 1956.
Whatever notation was made as occurring in or to Georgia or in the SE went onto the list shown.

I will be revising the list of genera but it is not intended to be all-encompassing. To revise it
I will be using the Flora of North America and will be limited to whatever information has been
published thereon. The listing will be noted as being genera that are known to occur in the state
not necessarily within the Piedmont.

Any comments or further delimitation of genera (or even species) is always welcomed!
« Last Edit: January 20, 2008, 04:53:01 PM by terrestrial_man » Logged
terrestrial_man
New member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 18


WWW
« Reply #13 on: January 21, 2008, 11:30:08 PM »

In my latest effort to pull the info out of eFloras.org Flora of North America I have decided to include links to those species that are noted as occurring in Georgia, whether or not they occur in the Piedmont is not known to me. Here is a sample (I am testing my linking).

Pleuridium ravenelii  http://www.efloras.org/object_page.aspx?object_id=85450&flora_id=1

When done I will have whatever species applies to GA on this thread (as of this period).
Logged
terrestrial_man
New member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 18


WWW
« Reply #14 on: January 28, 2008, 04:23:15 AM »

Attention: I have removed the listing that was found here and have combined the two lists on this thread with an update reply into one listing found on the second page. I have added links to images not found at the USDA site. Please see page 2 for this updated and compiled list. Posted Jan. 21, 2011.     
« Last Edit: January 21, 2011, 09:50:20 PM by terrestrial_man » Logged
Pages: [1] 2   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  



Login with username, password and session length