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 11 
 on: October 02, 2011, 10:42:11 AM 
Started by Don Newton - Last post by Don Newton
From my back yard ...




From the Gwinett Environmental and Heritage Center ...



Something is different, no?

I'll trip back out there with extra batteries and my son as my pack mule.

 12 
 on: September 23, 2011, 01:05:39 PM 
Started by Don Newton - Last post by Don Newton
I now believe you are correct, Rich - have to, as I am no where close to being a botanist.  The range of B. oneidense does not extend down here, though the Chattahoochee Zone would be a good highway for it.  Allyson Read, biologist, CRNRA, suggests B. biternatum, too.  She reinforced my suspicion that plant collecting in the Park is a major no-no.

Appreciate your in-put and knowledge.

 13 
 on: September 20, 2011, 09:27:01 PM 
Started by Rich - Last post by Rich
Saturday, Oct . 8, 2011 at 2:00.   Honoring Marie and her many contributions, and inviting all to see the new Marie Mellinger Educational Center at Black Rock Mt. State Park, Clayton GA.  Located in the campground area next to the  "office."     This will not be the offical State Dedication- for they are too busy- but will be for all who remember Marie and want to share memories.

 14 
 on: September 20, 2011, 09:24:49 PM 
Started by Don Newton - Last post by Rich
Definitley correct genus, but probably either S. biternatum (southern grape fern) or S. dissectum (cut-leaf grape fern).  Hard to be positive from the photo.

Rich

 15 
 on: September 18, 2011, 05:38:13 PM 
Started by Don Newton - Last post by Don Newton
Sceptridium (= Botrychium) oneidense.

http://michiganflora.net/species.aspx?id=1785

http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/rsg/profile.html?action=elementDetail&selectedElement=PPOPH010C0

Note the distribution.    Shocked

 16 
 on: September 17, 2011, 02:05:26 PM 
Started by Don Newton - Last post by Don Newton
I found this unusual plant at Jones Bridge Park, Fulton County side, right bank, riparian, of the Chattahoochee River.  Thanks in advance for any help.








 17 
 on: August 06, 2011, 05:23:52 PM 
Started by mikepaddler - Last post by mikepaddler
I saw at least half a dozen stems of Triphora trianthophora in early bloom today in Paulding County, though none were open. Based on past experience, I would think next Friday or Saturday, August 13 & 14, would be a good time to find them, but its difficult to predict this elusive orchid.

 18 
 on: July 19, 2011, 10:12:13 PM 
Started by Rich - Last post by mikepaddler
This could indeed be terrible news for Sosebee Cove and perhaps other wonderlands in North Georgia.  Keep us posted.

 19 
 on: July 11, 2011, 08:19:38 PM 
Started by Rich - Last post by Rich
There are recent reports of Ranunculus ficaria (Ficaria verna), which goes by the common name of buttercup fig or lesser celandine, in Sosebee Cove in the Chattahoochee National Forest. This is a very aggressive species that could quickly overwhelm Sosebee Cove and potentiallyinvade other botanically rich areas nearby such as the Coosa Bald Research Natural Area.

There is additional information at http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/fact/rafi1.htm

This is a rather nasty species that can completely blanket the ground. We should heed Barney's advice and "Nip it in the bud."  

BotSoc members, you will see an initial planning effort for a workday next spring to start the process of control/eradication in our September Newsletter.

 20 
 on: May 26, 2011, 08:35:03 PM 
Started by Rich - Last post by Rich
Birdsong is sponsoring a trip to this very special place north of Moultrie, GA.  Cost is $10 non-members, $5 members.  This contributes to Birdsong and provides the opportunity to go there with Birdsong board member Phil Spivey, recently of GA DNR, who had a lot to do with restoring the bog from its many-year overgrown state.  It is now one of Georgia's largest remaining pitcherplant bogs, featuring hooded and parrot pitcherplants, the yellow flytrap, and many other rare plants.  Ecosystems include natural bogs, longleaf-wiregrass uplands and pine floatwoods.  We will learn about fire-adapted natural communities, interesting wildflowers, and the efforts to preserve this sensitive system.  For reservations and directions on where to meet at Birdsong, Thomasville Walmart, or at the bog, call 229 377 4408 by noon Friday.
 
Birdsong's website is www.birdsongnaturecenter.org
 

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